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Different types of dart games

 

Rules For Cricket

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Cricket:

Cricket is my favorite dart game and also the one that I learned first. It is also the most common one played in bars across America. Cricket is a game that, unlike x01, requires some strategy that can help a weaker player beat a stronger player.

The Object: The object of the game is to "close" all your numbers (20 down through 15 and bulls-eye) and end up with more or equal points to your opponent. To close a number, you must hit three of that number.

The Scoring: The scoreboard is drawn with the numbers 20 through 15 and bullseye written in descending order down the center of the board. Bullseye is usually abbreviated with a B (or C for cork, another term for the bullseye). Each dart that lands in any of the games numbers count toward closing that number. The thin outer ring counts as two of that number and is called a "double". The thin inner ring counts as three of that number and is called a triple. Scoring for one dart is shown by placing a slash ( \ ) next to the number scored. Scoring for two is shown by placing an X next to the number scored. Scoring for three is shown by placing a circle next to the number to indicate it is closed. When three of a number is scored in any combination, it is closed.

The Play: The players each take a turn throwing one dart at bulls-eye, closest dart to the bull's-eye gets to throw first. The first player throws three darts at any of the scoring numbers to try to close that number and/or score points (points will be explained later, and games can be played without points). The player then scores the darts that he has thrown and play alternates until one person closes all their numbers and has more or equal points to the opponent.

Now let's talk about points. Points is what makes the game of Cricket very interesting. After you close a number, if your opponent does not have the same number closed, any darts that land in that number count as points for you and are totaled on your side of the board. For example, you have your 18 closed and your opponent only has one 18. If you throw a triple 18, you now have 54 points added to any points you may have already scored. If your opponent now throws a triple 18, only two count to close the number. The third does not count for points because your 18 is already closed. If a player has all of their numbers closed including bull's-eyes but has less points, that player has not yet won the game. He must throw enough points to be even or ahead of the opponent. If the only number the opponent has open is bull's-eyes, then the player must throw extra bull's-eyes at 25 points each (or 50 points for the double bulls-eye).

Strategy: The best strategy is to close the highest numbers first in descending order (this is the reason they are written that way on the scoreboard). The reason for this is that if points are scored, the player with the higher number closed has a big advantage. If you closed your 20 and scored 20 points in your first round, your opponent would have to throw TWO 19's after they are closed to make up the points and score 38.

One important note that I should point out (no pun intended): Deliberately shooting too many points can lead to a bar-room brawl. Darts is considered a "polite game" much like golf. Players do not typically "point monger" each other. Staying one or two bull's-eyes ahead (25 to 50 points) is acceptable. Throwing more points on another player that is not an INCREDIBLY stronger player is not a good idea.

On the other hand, by scoring an appropriate number early and simply staying on top of the other player, a weaker player can often beat a stronger player by making the other player have to throw extra bull's-eyes to end the game. Be very careful with this strategy though, sometimes the other player might suddenly turn the tables and will be sure to remember all those extra points you threw on him! Another thing that can happen is that you waste time trying to be sure you have enough points and when you get to the bull's-eyes, you discover that the other player couldn't miss a bull if he tried. What you wind up with is alot of darts you wasted that could have been tried at bulls and an opponent who is grinning from ear to ear. A clue to warn you that this is happening is when you throw alot of points and your opponent doesn't seem to care (that is he's not throwing any points back).

 

Rules For x01

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x01:

x01 (pronounced oh-one) is probably the easiest game to learn. The rules are very simple, yet the game requires skill in order to play well and win. It is a very good game for beginners because it develops accuracy around the whole board and the simple rules allow the players to concentrate on their throwing.

The Object: The game play starts with a score of 301, 401, 501, 601 or 1001. The object is to get to exactly zero by throwing rounds of three darts and subtracting the sum of those darts from your current score. Games may be played as "double-start" (also called "double-in") or "straight start" (also called "straight-in") this will be explained in THE PLAY section of this page. Games may also be played as "double out" ("double finish") or "straight out" ("straight finish") however "straight out" is extremely rare. Games of 301 and 601 are typically played as double in/double out. While games of 401, 501 and 1001 are typically played as straight in/double out.

The Scoring: The agreed upon starting score of the game is written at the top center of the score board (ie: 301) with a vertical line drawn down the center of score board. "DD" or "SD" are written above or below the starting score to indicate the agreed upon game (double-in/double-out or straight-in double-out). After each round, the total points thrown is written on the board along with the remaining score on that player/team's side of the board. A score of 100 is called a "ton" and is written on the board as a "T". Scores over 100 are called "ton" plus the rest that was thrown. For example a score of 120 would be called "a ton twenty" and would be written on the board "2T0".

The Play: Both players (or one player from each team) throw one dart each at the bulls-eye. The closest to the bulls-eye gets to throw first. Typically this player also names the game to be played. The initials of the players are written above each column of the scoreboard with the winner of the bulls-eye on the left.

If the game was called as a straight-in game, the first player (winner of the bulls-eye) begins by throwing three darts trying to attain the highest score possible. Each dart is scored by the number where it lands with the thin inner ring being worth 3 times the number indicated and the thin outer ring worth 2 times the number indicated while the two large sections score exactly the number indicated. Thus the highest attainable score with three darts is 180 by hitting three triple 20's.

If the game was called as a double-in game, the first player must hit any double on the board before they may begin counting their score. For example if the player threw a single 20, a double 20 and a single 20 the score would be 60 points. The first dart did not count because the player had not yet hit a double so only the second and third darts did count. Once a player has "gotten in" subsequent rounds do not require a double be thrown again.

Play continues alternating the players on each side of the board. When the scores get low the player starts to need to think about how they are going to get "out". The exact number a player should start to think about this varies with ability. A beginner should try to get to 40 or 32 (see the STRATEGY section) while an expert will start looking at 160!

A "double out" game means that you must hit a double that makes your score exactly zero to win the game. For example, if you have 32 points left, you must hit a double sixteen with your first scoring dart to win. If you miss the double sixteen and hit a single eight, you now have 24 points left and now have a score of 24. Lets say that now you score 23 points with your remaining two darts. You have "busted" because you only have 1 point and there is no way to throw half of 1. When you bust, all darts you threw in that round do not count and your turn is over. You also bust if you end up with less than zero or if you hit exactly zero but your last dart was not a double.

A "straight out" game means that no double is needed to win, you must simply arrive at zero points. Therefore, if you had a score of 32, simply hitting two single 16's will win the game. The only way to "bust" in a straight out game is to end up with less than zero as your total score.

Strategy: For beginner to intermediate players there are two simple strategies to follow. As players become more skillful they will be able to hit anywhere they aim for and will simply shoot for the most points and the quickest available "out".

There are many variations of "out-charts" available for various levels of players. An out-chart tells you the proper way to end a double-out game in two or three darts from almost every score of 160 or less. Beginners often try to hard to hit these difficult outs and worsen their position in the game.

Beginners should try to reach 32 points for their out (the double 16). The reason for this is simple, if you just miss the double 16 and hit a single 16, you now have 16 points left and you need a double 8. Do the same with the 8 and you need a double 4, and so on. If an odd number was tried for (say a double 17 from a score of 34) and you missed into the single, you now would have to throw an extra dart to get an out. If we follow the example of 34 out, your first dart misses and lands in the single 17. You now have a score of 17. There is no double 8.5 so you must throw an odd number to make the score even again. This gives the other player more opportunity to get out before you.

The second most important strategy is to throw your strongest number. Obviously better players will be aiming at the triple 20 to try to score the most points. A lot of players (myself included) don't do well with 20's, so they throw at triple 19's. Even if you throw at triple 15's and can hit one out of six in the triple or can simply throw all three darts into the single 15 your score will be much better than all the 1's and 5's you might hit if you can't hit the 20.

Rules For Around The Clock

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Around The Clock:

This is a very easy game, but good practice because it uses the whole board. It is also a very fast moving game and can usually be finished in under 10 minutes. Any number of players can play. Handicapping can be done by limiting the target area of stronger players.

The Object: To hit every number on the board IN ORDER with one dart and finish before the other players.

The Scoring: Scoring is not needed in this game as long as everyone can remember what number they are up to and what order they shoot.

The Play: The first player tries to shoot first at 1, when a one is hit, play moves on to two and so on until all three darts are thrown. The next player then does the same thing, and so on. Remember only the number that the player is shooting for counts and all the numbers must be shot in order.

Strategy: There isn't any.

Rules For Baseball

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Baseball:

Baseball is a very simple and fun game that may be played by as many players or teams as wish to play. There is a version of the game that must be played on a special dart board, but we will only be covering the version that is played on a standard English dart board.

The Object: The object is simple: score the most amount of runs each inning, the highest score at the end of the game wins.

The Scoring: The numbers 1 through 9 are written in ascending order on the left side of the scoreboard. All players names are written in batting order across the top (batting order may be determined any way, usually one dart each at bullseye with the closest throwing first and the furthest last). A grid may be drawn around the numbers and the names for easier reading.

The Play: Each player in order throws three darts at the number of the current inning. The target is 1's in the first inning, 2's in the second, etc. Each number only counts in the that actual inning. For example, if a 4 is hit in the first inning, it does not count. The thin outer "double" ring counts as two runs, the thin inner "triple" ring counts as three runs with the other sections of that number counting as one run. Therefore, the highest attainable score in any one inning is nine.

The number of runs scored is NOT multiplied by the inning number. For example, in the second inning, two single 2's and a double 2 are scored; that players score would be four for that inning.

Usually a running total is kept with the current inning's score being added to the current total. This way, players can see how far ahead or behind they are and saves a lot of time not having to add all nine innings at the end of the game.

If there is a tie at the end of the ninth inning, extra innings are played with bull's-eyes as the target. Extra innings continue until after all players have thrown for that inning and no tie exists.

One interesting twist that I like to play is the "7th inning stretch". This variation states that any player who does not score any runs in the seventh inning has their score cut in half. This puts a little more pressure on the seventh inning than any other and also gives a player who is far behind a chance to catch up.

Strategy: Try to score a lot of runs.

Rules For Golf

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Golf:

Golf is a game that may be played with as many players as desired. It is also a very quick game, limited to only 3 "shots" per "hole". Games may be played with 9 or 18 holes. A 9 hole game with 2 players can be played in 5 minutes or less.

The Object: Like real golf, the object is to complete each hole in as few shots as possible. The player with the lowest score at the end of 9 or 18 holes wins.

The Scoring: Players names are written across the top of the board in order. Order is usually determined by throwing one dart each for the bullseye with the closest playing first. This is a game that playing order makes no difference, all players have an equal number of throws to complete the game.

The agreed upon number of holes to play is written in order down the left side of the board (1 through 9 or 1 through 18). A running total is kept for each hole played and written next to the number of the hole in the column for that player.

The thin outer "doubles" ring counts as a hole in one. The thin inner "triples" ring counts as 2 strokes. The thin wedge between the bullseye and the triples ring counts as 3 strokes. The thick wedge between the doubles and triples ring counts as 4 strokes. Missing the number entirely counts a 5 strokes. 5 is the worst score you can score on any one hole.

The Play: The first player begins the first hole by throwing for 1's. The player may choose to throw one, two or all three darts for the hole. However many darts are thrown. The LAST dart thrown is the one that counts. For example, the player throws the first dart into the thin wedge of the 1 for a score of 3. Unsatisfied with this score, he throws the remaining two darts at the triple and misses the ones entirely. His score for is now 5 for the hole, he may not choose to count the first dart because he continued throwing. If he had been satisfied with the first dart, he may have kept the score of three and not thrown the remaining two darts.

The remaining players play through the first hole in order. When play returns to the first player, the second hole is played and 2 is the target number. The game continues as such until all 9 or 18 holes have been played.

Strategy: There isn't much strategy to this game, however unless your very good, be satisfied with what you have, you might end up like my example above.

 

Rules For Mulligan

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Mulligan:

This is a very difficult game with very simple rules. Generally it is a game played by very good players only. It may be played by any number of players.

The Object: To "close" six random numbers and the bullseye before your opponents.

The Scoring: The players names are written across the top of the board in playing order. Playing order is usually determined by throwing one dart each at bullseye, and the closest plays first.

"Closing" a number means hitting three of that number. In the case of this game only the triples ring (the thin inner ring) counts in this game except for the bullseye round. Each triple counts as one towards closing the number. Therefore three triples of each number and three bull's-eyes must be hit to win the game.

Six random numbers are chosen from the board as the targets. The random numbers may be chosen by throwing darts left handed at the board or just called out. These numbers are written down the left hand side of the board and a "B" for bullseye below them.

A score of one is indicated by writing a slash ("/") next to the number, a score of two by writing an X and a score of three by writing a circle ("O") to show it is closed.

The Play: The first player throws darts at the triple of the first number on the list. No other numbers count until the first number is closed.

Play continues alternating players until someone has closed all six numbers and the bullseye in order.

Strategy: Practice and be a pretty good player before attempting this game. If you don't plan for a very late night.

 

Rules For Tic-Tac-Toe

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Tic-Tac-Toe:

Tic-Tac-Toe is a fun simple game for 2 players or teams. It combines the standard rules of the pen-and-paper game with darts.

The Object: Getting a tic-tac-toe just like the regular game by having three X's or O's in a row horizontally, vertically or diagonally.

The Scoring: Three tic-tac-toe boards are drawn on the scoreboard, 1 small one in each of the two player/team's columns and one larger one in the center. The small ones are used to mark what each player hits and the big one is used for the actual tic-tac-toe game.

The numbers that are used for the game appear on the dartboard with similar placement to the tic-tac-toe box they represent (B means bullseye):

 

12

20

18

11

B

6

7

3

2

 

In order to place an X or an O in the big game board, a player must "close" the number first in the small game board. To close a number, three of that number must be scored with the thin outer ring counting as two of that number (called a "double") and the thin inner ring counting as three (called a triple). A score of one is indicated with a slash ("/"). A score of two is indicated with an X. And a score of three is indicated with a circle to show it is "closed".

For example, a player hits a single 18, a double 18 and a single 7. In his small board, he would place a circle in the upper left hand box to show he closed 18 and a slash in the lower left hand box to indicate the single 7. Now because he closed 18 first, he claims the upper left hand corner of the big game board by placing his X or O in that box. 18's now no longer count for the other player.

The Play: Players throw one dart each at bullseye, closest dart throws first and that player's name is written above the left small board with the other player's name written above the right small board. This player also chooses to be X's or O's and writes that near the small board too.

The first player will try to close the numbers that count as quickly as possible to place an X or O where desired.

Players alternate until someone wins a tic-tac-toe or the game is a draw.

Strategy: If you do not know the strategy to tic-tac-toe, you should seek professional help.

Rules For Australian Cricket

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Australian Cricket:

This is a game playable by to individuals or teams. It is played similar to one inning of Australian or British Cricket.

The Object: To score higher than your opponent after each has had a turn as "bowler" and "batsman".

The Scoring: The players' names are written at the top of the scoreboard and a vertical line is drawn dividing the scoreboard into two columns. The numbers one through nine are written vertically on each player's side to indicate the "wickets".

The Play: Each player throws one dart at bullseye, closest to the bullseye chooses to be the "bowler" or the "batsman" first.

The "batsman" always throws first. The batsman tries to score as many points as possible with the thin outer "doubles" ring counting as two times the number thrown and the thin inner "triples" ring counting as three times the number thrown. At the end of the throw, the three darts are totaled and 40 is subtracted. The remaining score is the batsman's score for that throw. If the batsman only threw 40 or under, the score is zero. For example, if the batsman threw single-20, single-20, single-5; the score would be 5 (20+20+5=45, 45-40=5).

After the batsman throws, the "bowler" throws next. The bowler tries to bowl nine wickets as quickly as possible. To score a wicket, the bowler must hit the bullseye, the outer bullseye scores one wicket and the inner scores two. If the bowler throws a dart outside of the thin inner "triples" ring, points equivalent to the number the dart landed in are given to the batsman (without subtracting 40).

Each time the bowler scores a wicket, one of the nine wickets is crossed off the bowler's side of the board. When all nine wickets have been crossed out, half the inning (the game, although, games may be played with more than one inning) is over, the players reverse roles and play begins again. Whoever has the higher score wins the game.

One last catch, if the batsman accidentally hits a bullseye, one wicket is scored for the bowler (two if it's a double bullseye).

Strategy: There isn't any.

Rules For Blind Killers

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Blind Killers:

Blind Killers is a really fun game designed to be played with 3 or more people. The more people playing the more fun it is. It is a great game to play when there are an odd number of people and everyone wants to play darts. This is also an EXCELLENT way to practice your out's for x01. This particular game is a game of memory, trust, honesty and luck, it is not a game to be played with strangers at the pub late at night (or for money).

The Object: To win Blind Killers you must simply be the last person on the scoreboard with a life left.

The Scoring: The names are place down the left side of the score board in any order. Generally, after the first game is played, the player who was knocked out first gets to throw first in the next game. For the first game, I usually do a closest to the bullseye with one dart each. Next to each name, three tally marks are placed to indicate the number of lives each player has left.

The Play: Play is identical to that of regular Killers except that no one knows what the other players numbers are! Please be sure to read the rules for Killers before continuing with this game.

The numbers 1 through 20 are written on slips of paper and placed in a hat. Each player takes a slip of paper and remembers the number on it. That number is that players number for the duration of the game. It is not necessary to throw your own double to become a killer (you'd only give away your number if you did.

This game obviously relies on honesty and memory. The player's must remember there number and watch carefully for other people to hit it. They must also remember how many lives they have left and step down when the third life is taken.

Variations of this game can be played to adjust to the players' level. You could use all triples for stronger players or require a double bull to become a killer. For weaker players, use the thin inner wedge of the number. On occasion, I have had several average players and one "I never picked up a dart before" kind of person (notice they always seem to win!) want to play. So what I do is set that the "new player" only has to hit the thin or thick single wedge to become a killer or kill while the rest of us have to hit doubles. With all the combinations available it's easy to balance the play to be fun for everyone.

Strategy: There is no strategy, this is a game of luck. The only hint is to try to watch your opponents faces and body language when you hit or get real close to a double, there might be the slightest reaction that can clue you if that number is owned.

Rules For Broad Jump

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Broad Jump:

Broad Jump is a very unique style of game similar only to its cousin, High Jump. It may be played by any number of players or teams and is a good game to play with an odd number of people.

The Object: The object of the game is to "jump" further then your opponents.

The Scoring: Players names are written in order down the left side of the scoreboard. Order is usually determined by throwing one dart each at bullseye. Closest to the bullseye throws first, farthest throws last.

The Play: Each player in turn throws three darts trying to advance the target numbers to make the longest "jump". The targets are across the center of the board in order: Double-11, Large-11, Triple-11, Small-11, Bullseye, Double-Bullseye, Bullseye, Small-6, Triple-6, Large-6, Double-6.

For a dart to count, the targets must be hit in order, one dart each. Play begins with the Double-11, once the Double-11 is hit the player may now throw at Large-11 and so on across the board.

After the each player throws all three darts, the "furthest" target that was hit becomes the length of the jump and is written next to the player's name and play continues with the next player. The next time that player throws again, the target number is the next number after the old target. This means that each round extends the length of the jump.

If the player misses the target with all three darts, that player's jump is over and the last target that was hit becomes the final length of the jump. That player does not throw again.

After all players have missed their target with three darts, whoever's jump was longest wins the game. If more than one player have the same length jump at the end of the game or both made it all the way across the board, those players alone should play again to break the tie.

Strategy: Take your time and concentrate when you get to the bullseye area. They are hard to hit, but if you get past them, it's all down hill from there.

 

Rules For Bullseye Baseball

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Bullseye Baseball:

Baseball is a difficult yet fun game that may be played by as many players or teams as wish to play. It is the same game as regular Baseball with a twist to make it more challenging.

The Object: The object is simple: score the most amount of runs each inning, the highest score at the end of the game wins.

The Scoring: The numbers 1 through 9 are written in ascending order on the left side of the scoreboard. All players names are written in batting order across the top (batting order may be determined any way, usually one dart each at bullseye with the closest throwing first and the furthest last). A grid may be drawn around the numbers and the names for easier reading.

The Play: Each player in order throws three darts at the number of the current inning but must hit a bullseye each inning before any runs may be scored that inning. If no bullseye is hit, the score for the inning is zero. The target is 1's in the first inning, 2's in the second, etc. Each number only counts in the that actual inning. For example, if a 4 is hit in the first inning, it does not count. The thin outer "double" ring counts as two runs, the thin inner "triple" ring counts as three runs with the other sections of that number counting as one run. If more than one bullseye is hit the score is multiplied by the number of bull's-eye's hit. Therefore, the highest attainable score in any one inning is twelve (Double-Bullseye, Triple-x, Triple-x {where x is the number of the inning} would score 6 for the two triples time 2 bull's-eyes).

The number of runs scored is NOT multiplied by the inning number. For example, in the second inning, a bullseye and two single 2's are hit; that players score would be two for that inning.

Usually a running total is kept with the current inning's score being added to the current total. This way, players can see how far ahead or behind they are and saves a lot of time not having to add all nine innings at the end of the game.

If there is a tie at the end of the ninth inning, extra innings are played with bull's-eyes as the target. Extra innings continue until after all players have thrown for that inning and no tie exists.

Strategy: Try to score a lot of runs.

Rules For Call Three

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Call Three:

This is an excellent practice game to really sharpen your accuracy around the board. It can be played by any number of players or teams.

The Object: The object is to have the highest score after 10 rounds of play.

The Scoring: The players names are written across the top of the score board in order. Playing order is determined by a throw at bullseye, closest dart plays first. The numbers 1 through 10 are written down the center of the board to indicate the 10 rounds of play.

The Play: The first player goes to the line and the player who is to throw next calls off three numbers for the first player to hit. Any three numbers may be used, 1-20 and bull's-eyes.

The first player now throws ONE dart at each of the three numbers in the order called out. Only darts that land in the called out numbers count and they only count in the proper order. The thin outer "doubles" ring counts as 2 points, the thin inner "triples" ring counts as 3 points and the remaining area of the number count as 1 point. If bull's-eyes are used, the outer bullseye counts as 2 points and the inner bullseye counts as three points.

The total that was hit is written next to the round-number and play continues on to the next player. After all ten rounds are played, the player with the highest total score wins.

The Strategy: This game has no strategy, it is a game of accuracy. If you play on a dart team with your opponent's), you should try to stick to numbers that give them trouble during league games.

Rules For Castle

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Castle:

This is a fun game of British origin that may be played by any number of people.

The Object: To be the first player to build a castle (represented by a 5x5 pyramid of boxes).

 

The Scoring: Playing order is determined with a throw of one dart each at bullseye, closest to the bullseye goes first, furthest goes last. Names are written on the board in throwing order with a representation of their castle next to their name:

The Play: Each player throws one dart with the wrong hand to set a random number. It does not matter if the dart lands in the double or triples ring for this throw. Only the raw number matters. This number is written with the players name and castle and is the target for that player for the remainder of the game.

After all players have set their target numbers, they throw three darts each turn to try to build a castle. Each dart that hits the players target number checks off one box in the castle. The thin outer "doubles" ring counts as two and the thin inner "triples" ring counts as three. The first player to build their castle (that is to check off all 15 boxes) wins the game.

A player may choose during any turn to knock down a piece of another player's castle instead of trying to build. This is done by hitting the other player's target number with doubles and triples counting in the usual way. Keep in mind that if a player has no boxes checked, you can't knock down what he/she doesn't have. For example, if a player has 3 boxes checked and you throw a single and a triple of his target number for a score of 4, the player does not have to throw any extra.

Strategy: Keep an eye on how fast the other players are building. If a player is getting too far ahead, throw a dart or two to bring him/her down.

Rules For Checkout

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Checkout:

Checkout is a short very simple game that may be played by any number of players or teams.

The Object: Is to exactly hit 5 target sums in as few darts as possible.

The Scoring: 5 random numbers are chosen between 1 and 180 and written down the center of the board. These are the "target sums" that must be hit to score.

The target sums may be chosen in many different manners and may be adjusted for a players ability. For example, keeping the sums under 60 would mean that a round may be completed by hitting only singles (ie: three 20's would score 60), no doubles or triples are needed. By keeping the sums under 100 would mean that no triples need be hit, only doubles and singles. The standard way is to choose one sum that may be hit by one dart, two that require two darts and three that require three darts.

The players names are written across the top of the score board in order. Playing order is determined by a throw at bullseye, closest dart plays first.

5 columns are drawn below each players' names to indicate the 5 attempts each player has to hit target sum.

The Play: Players take alternating turns, in order, to try and score exactly the target sum in as few darts as possible. You do not have to throw all three darts. If you get exactly the target sum with one or two darts, stop throwing.

The thin outer "doubles" ring counts as two times the number hit and the thin inner "triples" ring counts as three times the number hit.

The number of darts used to score the target sum is scored next to the target number. If you do not score exactly the target sum with three darts, you score a three for that round and play continues on to the next player. You have five rounds to hit the target sum, once all five rounds are used or you hit the target sum, you then move on to the next target sum.

Once all five target sums have been completed (either by scoring them or using up all five attempts) the game is over. The total number of darts used is added up for each player (or team) and whoever has the LOWER score wins the game (less darts were used to complete game). In the example game above, Fred won.

Strategy: Try to factor in numbers that can easily hit into how you arrive at the target sum.

Rules For Diddle For Middle

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Diddle For Middle:

This is a difficult game similar to x01. It is intended for two players of intermediate to advanced ability.

The Object: To be the first to score exactly 501 beginning and ending with a double.

The Scoring: Playing order is determined by a throw of one dart each at bullseye, closest to the bullseye goes first. The names are written in order at the top of the board with the number 501 in between. A vertical line divides the board into columns for each player.

The Play: Each player must "double-in" before any score may count for the game. This means you must hit any double around the board and only the double and any darts thrown after the double count toward your score.

After the initial double is hit, the only areas the count for scoring are INSIDE (but not including) the thin inner "triples" ring. Any dart that hits a triple or outside does not count. Players aim at the bullseye and double-bullseye to try and score 25 or 50 points respectively with each dart. Any darts that land in the small inner wedge between the bullseye and the triples ring counts as the number hit. The score of the three darts is totaled and subtracted from the players current score.

When the player gets to 50 or below, the player must throw a double to end exactly on zero. For example, if the player has 38 points left, the player must throw a double-19 to win the game. If the player scores more than the number of points left it is called a "bust" and all darts thrown that round do not count; that is the score remains the same.

Strategy: Try to always leave yourself on an even number so you can get your double-out easily. If you have an odd number you will have to throw an extra dart to get even before trying your double.

Rules For Fifty-One In 5's

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Fifty-One In 5's:

This is a really fun game that may be played by any number of players. However, do not try to teach this game to anyone who has trouble with the math in x01 or someone who is drunk (not that dart players EVER drink). This game requires more thought about each throw than most.

The Object: Be the first player to reach a score of exactly 51.

The Scoring: Players names are written across the top of the board in playing order. Order is usually determined by throwing one dart at bullseye each, closest to the bullseye shoots first.

A running total is kept vertically below each player's name to show the current score he or she has.

The Play: Each player throws three darts trying to score a total of the three darts that is EXACTLY divisible by 5. If the player's total is not divisible by 5, all three darts do not count.

If the player's total is exactly divisible by 5, divide the total by 5 and that number is the score for the round. For example, a player throws a single 20, a single 20 and a single 5. The score for that player would be 9 (20+20+5=45 45/5=9).

If any one dart misses the board entirely, all three darts thrown in that round do not count.

To win the game, a total of 51 must be hit exactly. If the total ends up more than 51, all three of the darts thrown in that round do not count and the score remains the same.

Strategy: The two best places on the board to throw are at the 20/5 area or the 10/15 area. Each of these areas give a nice wide target where hitting either number leaves you divisible by 5.

 

Rules For Fifty-One/Fifty-Seven

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Fifty-One/Fifty-Seven:

This is an excellent practice game to really sharpen your accuracy on triples. It can be played by any number of players or teams.

The Object: The object is to reach a pre-determined score first.

The Scoring: What number you are going to play needs to be determined, either 51 or 57, and should be written at the top of the scoreboard. For the example in this game, we'll use 51. What score you're going to play to should also be written at the top of the board. I like to play to 300, however, 500 or 1000 also works well if you're looking for a longer game. You may also handicap players by requiring weaker shooters to score 300 while stronger ones 500 or 1000.

Players names are written across the top of the board in playing order. Playing order is determined by a throw of one dart by each player/team at the bullseye. Closest to the bullseye goes first.

 

The Play: The board is scored in the standard way. The thin outer "doubles" ring counts as two times the number hit, the thin inner "triples" ring counts as three times and the remaining wedges count as the number hit.

Generally, you begin by trying to throw the triple-17. If you hit the triple-17, you have already scored 51 and you turn is complete. You DO NOT have to throw all three darts.

If the triple-17 is missed, you must now hit any combination of numbers on the board with one or two of your remaining darts and end up with a total of exactly 51.

If you scored a total of exactly 51, add to your side of the board (keep a running total). If you scored a total of less than or more than 51, you did not score for that round. Play continues on to the next player and alternates until one player/team has scored 300 or above (or whatever goal was decided upon in the beginning).

You can play this game using any number that is scorable with a one-dart-triple: 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30, 33, 36, 39, 42, 45, 48, 51, 54, 57 or 60. The most common games are for 51 or 57.

The Strategy: This game has no strategy, it is a game of accuracy.

Rules For Follow The Leader

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Follow The Leader:

This is a very simple yet fun game to play. It is very similar to the basketball game "Horse" (you may know that game under other names). It may be played by any number of players and is more fun with a lot of people. This game is actually pretty boring with only two players.

The Object: To win the game you must be the last player to have any lives left.

The Scoring: Players names are written in any order down the left side of the scoreboard. Usually, a throw of one dart each at bullseye with the closet player throwing first and the furthest throwing last. After the first game, the first player to get knocked out plays first and so on. Three tallies are marked next to each name to indicate the number of lives left.

The Play: The first player throws one dart left-handed (or right-handed if that player is a lefty) to set a random target. Because the first player has no chance to lose a life, the random throw is used to give the second player a fair chance.

The EXACT wedge or bullseye the dart landed is marked on the scoreboard. If the dart lands in the 5 between the triple ring and the bullseye, you would mark "S5" to indicate the small wedge of the 5. If the dart landed in the triple 5, you would write "T5". If the dart landed in the 5 between the triple and the double rings, you would write "B5" to indicate the big wedge of the 5. If the dart landed in the double 5, you would write "D5".

The next player now must try to land a dart in the exact same wedge of the board. If that player is unsuccessful with all three darts, one life is erased and the next player has a chance.

If the player is successful in matching the wedge any darts remaining in hand may now be used to score a new target. If the target was hit with the third dart, the player pulls the darts and has all three to establish a new target. All three darts need not been thrown in a turn the player may stop at any time after the number was matched and the last dart thrown at the board is the new target. The player may not make a choice of the darts thrown, only the last dart counts. If the player misses the board with the last dart that can be thrown, a life is lost and the target remains at the previous one set.

For example, a player has to hit "S5" (the small wedge of the 5). With the first dart he hits the "S5". He now has two darts to set a new target. He aims at double bull ("D25") and hits it. He may now choose to sit down and not throw the third dart and leave the "D25". Let's say that, for some insane reason (maybe drunkenness), he decides to try for a double 18, and misses off the board. He now loses a life and the next player now must hit "S5". The next player now gets up and hits the "S5" on his third dart. He pulls his darts and throws his first dart and hits "T20" (triple 20). Satisfied, he sits down choosing not to throw the other two darts.

If a player sets a target and all other players fail to match the target, when it's that players turn again, no throw is necessary. The player may choose to stay seated and keep the same target number. If the player chooses to risk trying a turn, the player MUST hit the target same as everyone else. If the player misses a life is lost just as if he did not set the number that stumped everyone else. It is usually wiser to just leave the number and not take the risk.

Strategy: There really isn't much strategy, just make sure when your setting the next target number that your last dart hits and stays in the board. It's better to leave the next player a big fat single-20 as a target than to have your last dart bounce-out of the double-bull.

 

Rules For Football

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Football:

This is a fun game for two teams of 1-4 players. The rules are very simple, but the game is quite challenging.

The Object: The object is to be the first to score a predetermined number in a manner similar to American football.

The Scoring: One player from each team throws one dart a bullseye, closest to the bullseye goes first. The team names are written on the board in order and a 0 placed next to each name to indicate the current score. The teams pick a side of the board to be their "goal line", either 11 or 6.

The Play: Each team has four "downs" to try to move the ball across the board and into their opponent's goal. Each down consist of three darts thrown and players on the team alternate for equal opportunity to play.

The playable area of the board is the Double-11, Large-11, Triple-11, Small-11, Bullseye, Double-Bullseye, Bullseye, Small-6, Triple-6, Large-6 and Double-6. One teams goal line is the Double-11 and the other team's goal line is the Double-6. The Double-Bullseye is the "50 yard line".

The first team starts at there own goal line, for example Double-6. They try to hit one dart in each number in order across the board. The team plays all 4 of it downs (a total of 12 darts) in a row to try to move the ball as far across the field as possible. At the end of the 4 downs, the other team "takes possession of the ball" where the original team left it and has 4 downs to try to move it back across the goal line.

If a team scores a goal (sequentially hitting all the target numbers across the board ending in the other team's goal line {the double 6 or 11}) that team earns 6 points and has an opportunity to throw for an extra point. An extra point is scored by throwing one dart in the 20. Where the dart lands in the twenty does not matter, it always scores as only one point.

After a goal is scored, the other team takes possession of the ball in it's own goal regardless of how many darts or downs the scoring team had left.

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Strategy: Take your time and concentrate on the bull's-eyes. They are hard to hit, but once you get across, it's all down hill and the other team has to get the ball back across.

Rules For 14 Stop

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14 Stop:

14 Stop is an easy and fun game that may be played by as many teams as wish to play. It is almost the same game as regular Baseball with a twist to make it more interesting.

The Object: The object is simple: score the most amount of runs each inning, the highest score at the end of the game wins.

The Scoring: The numbers 1 through 9 are written in ascending order on the left side of the scoreboard. All players names are written in batting order across the top (batting order may be determined any way, usually one dart each at bullseye with the closest throwing first and the furthest last). A grid may be drawn around the numbers and the names for easier reading.

The Play: One player on each team is chosen to hit the 14's and the other to score the runs.

The 14 shooter always throws first in each inning, trying to throw as many 14's as possible.

Each scorer then throws three darts at the number of the current inning. If no 14's were hit by the 14 shooter, the score for the inning is zero. The target is 1's in the first inning, 2's in the second, etc. Each number only counts in the that actual inning. For example, if a 4 is hit in the first inning, it does not count. The thin outer "double" ring counts as two runs, the thin inner "triple" ring counts as three runs with the other sections of that number counting as one run. The score is multiplied by the number of 14's hit by the 14 shooter. Therefore, the highest attainable score in any one inning is 81 (three triple 14's=9 and three triples by the scorer=9, 9x9=81).

The number of runs scored is NOT multiplied by the inning number. For example, in the second inning, the 14 shooter hit one 14 and the scorer hit two single 2's; that players score would be two for that inning.

Usually a running total is kept with the current inning's score being added to the current total. This way, players can see how far ahead or behind they are and saves a lot of time not having to add all nine innings at the end of the game.

If there is a tie at the end of the ninth inning, extra innings are played with bull's-eyes as the target. Extra innings continue until after all players have thrown for that inning and no tie exists.

Strategy: Try to score a lot of runs.

Rules For Fox Hunt

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Fox Hunt:

This is a challenging and sometimes frustrating game. It is best enjoyed by 2 players of equal skill (preferably intermediate to advanced).

The Object: The object of the "fox" is to get back to his "burrow" before being caught.

The object of the "hound" is to catch the fox before he gets back to his burrow.

Each player has a chance to be the fox and the hound, whoever gets further around the board as the fox wins the game.

The Scoring: There really is no scoring needed. All that needs to be remembered is what number you're up to and after the roles are reversed, where the first fox finished.

The Play: Each player throws one dart at bullseye, closest to the bullseye is the fox and goes first.

The fox starts on 20 and must throw one dart in order into the double-20 and the single-20 to advance. The double twenty is the thin outer ring and the single is either of the large wedges. After the 20 is completed, the fox continues counter-clockwise around the board first hitting the double then the single of each number. After three darts are thrown, the hound then gets a chance to try to catch the fox.

The hound starts on 18 and must throw one dart into the double 18 to advance. After the double-18 is hit, the hound progresses counter-clockwise throwing one dart into each double in order. After three darts are thrown the play goes back to the fox.

If the fox makes it all the way around the board back to the double-20 (no single needs to be thrown when the fox returns to the 20) the round is over. If the hound hits the double of the number the fox is on (it does not matter if the fox in on the double or the single) the hound has captured the fox and the round is over.

Wherever the fox was when the round ended is remembered or marked on the scoreboard and the roles of the fox and hound are reversed. The new fox must try to get further around the board than the first fox did. If both foxes make it home the game is a tie and may be played again to determine a winner.

Strategy: When your the fox, don't get caught. When your the hound, catch the fox.

Rules For Football

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Football:

Kind of an odd game that really sharpens your ability to hit bull's-eyes. This game can be played with 2 players or 2 teams.

The Object: To score at least the same number of points faster than your opponent was able to.

The Scoring: Four tallies are marked each side of the board to represent the four "downs" that the offense possesses the ball. The players names are written at the top of each column.

The Play: Both players throw one dart at bullseye, closest to the bull throws first and has the option of "receiving the ball". If the player "receives" he will play offense first and try to score points. If the player chooses not to receive he will play defense and try to stop the other player from scoring too many points.

The offensive player throws first and tries to score as high a score as possible with three darts. The thin outer ring is the "double" and counts as two time the number scored. The thin inner ring is the "triple" and counts as three times the number scored. Scores less than 41 with three darts do not count. Any score 41 or greater is added to the offensive player's score.

Next, the defensive player throws three darts at bullseye. Any darts that hit the bullseye remove one down each (two if it is a double bullseye). Erase one tally from the offensive player's side for each bullseye the defense scored.

Play continues alternating players until the defense has remove all four downs from the offensive player. Once all four downs are removed, "possession of the ball" is turned over to the original defensive player. The offensive player now plays defense and the defensive player now plays offense.

The goal of the new offensive player is to score more points than the original offensive player scored.

Strategy: There really is no strategy to this game, it's really just a game of accuracy. The only hint I can offer is that misses around the 19 score more than misses around the 20.

 

Rules For Halvers

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Halvers:

Halvers is a fun game for 2 players or teams.

The Object: To get a higher score than the other team.

The Scoring: One player from each team throws at bullseye, closest to the bullseye plays first. A score board is drawn up as shown:

 

 

Team #1

 

Team #2

 

20

 
 

19

 
 

T

 
 

18

 
 

D

 
 

17

 
 

16

 
 

3C

 
 

15

 
 

H

 
 

14

 
 

25

 
 

50

 

 

The Play: Each team throws three darts to try and attain the highest score based on the target listed in the scoreboard each round. The rounds are played in order listed on the scoreboard and only the targets described for that particular round count. The thin outer "doubles" ring counts as two times the number hit and the thin inner "triples" ring counts as three.

The rounds 20, 19, 18, 17, 16, 15, 14, 25 and 50 mean to aim for the number specified. For example during the 20's round only darts in the 20 count, etc. 25 means single bulls ONLY, doubles do not count. 50 means double bulls ONLY, singles do not count.

The remaining rounds are as follows:

T = Triples round, any triples count.

D = Doubles round, any doubles count.

3C = 3 Colors round. Each dart must land in a different COLOR on the board.

H = Hurdles round. The first dart is thrown anywhere on the board and the next darts must "hurdle" a number clockwise. For example, the first dart is thrown into the 20, the next dart has to hit the 18 to count and the next dart has to hit the 13 to count. These darts must be in order.

If all three darts miss the target number, your previous score is cut in half, hence the name of the game. For example, in the first round you throw two single-20's for a score of 40. In the next round, you miss the 19's altogether, your total score would now be 20.

Strategy: Be CAREFUL when you get to the 25 & 50 sections of the game, those bulls can be elusive and missing them can quickly kill a big lead!

Rules For High Jump

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High Jump:

High Jump is a very unique style of game similar only to it's cousin, Broad Jump. It may be played by any number of players or teams and is a good game to play with an odd number of people.

The Object: The object of the game is to "jump" higher than your opponents.

The Scoring: Players names are written in order down the left side of the scoreboard. Order is usually determined by throwing one dart each at bullseye. Closest to the bullseye throws first, farthest throws last.

The Play: Each player in turn throws three darts trying to advance the target numbers to make the highest "jump". The targets are up the center of the board in order: Double-3, Large-3, Triple-3, Small-3, Bullseye, Double-Bullseye, Bullseye, Small-20, Triple-20, Large-20, Double-20.

For a dart to count, the targets must be hit in order, one dart each. Play begins with the Double-3, once the Double-3 is hit the player may now throw at Large-3 and so on across the board.

After the each player throws all three darts, the "highest" target that was hit becomes the height of the jump and is written next to the player's name and play continues with the next player. The next time that player throws again, the target number is the next number after the old target. This means that each round extends the height of the jump for that player.

If the player misses the target with all three darts, that player's jump is over and the last target that was hit becomes the final height of the jump. That player does not throw again.

After all players have missed their target with three darts, whoever's jump was highest wins the game. If more than one player have the same height jump at the end of the game or both made it all the way across the board, those players alone should play again to break the tie.

Strategy: Take your time and concentrate when you get to the bullseye area. They are hard to hit, but if you get past them, it's all down hill from there.

Rules For High/Low

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High/Low:

These are actually two mostly identical games: High and Low. Most people I have played with find Low to be the more fun version. These are games that can be played with any number of players, including an odd number. The more people that play, the more fun they are.

The Object: To be the only person in the game with any lives left.

 

The Scoring: Names are written in any order down the left side of the scoreboard. Usually a throw of one dart each sets the playing order with closet to the bulls-eye throwing first. After the first game, play order is played with whoever lost first plays first on down to the winner playing last. Three tally marks are placed next to each name to indicate the number of lives left and High or Low is written on the top to indicate the version being played.

The Play: First, I'm going to explain High because it is simpler than Low. The first player throws two darts SIMULTANEOUSLY to set a starting number. The first player has no chance to lose a life and therefore is handicapped from hitting a really good score to put the next player at a higher risk. The sum of the two darts is written on the board, this is the target number for the next player.

The next player throws three darts in the traditional manner trying to score a higher total than the previous player. Remember that higher means higher, ties to the number DO NOT count unless the score is over 100 points.

If a player has scored higher than the previous player, no life is lost. If the score was not higher the player erases one life. Either way, that player's score is the new score for the next player to beat. The old score is erased or crossed out and the new score written on the board.

Play continues until only one player has any lives left and he/she wins.

Now let's talk about Low. Low is played exactly like High except that you must score LOWER than the previous player's score to not lose a life. "Easy, I'll just throw all three darts off the board!" WRONG. Any darts that miss or fall out of the board count as 25 points!

Another twist to this game is that if you hit a bulls-eye, 25 points are SUBTRACTED from your score! So, if you mange to somehow hit three double bull's-eyes, your score would be -150 (negative one hundred and fifty)!

Pretty interesting, huh? If you've played x01 before, you'll be absolutely astounded by how many triple-20's you'll hit while aiming for the fat single-1!! Just remember, Murphy was an optimist.

Strategy: These games really don't have much strategy. When I play Low, I always like to throw the first dart at bull in hopes of starting my total with -25 or -50. If I miss, I just try to lob two fat single-1's.

In either game, if you know you're going to lose a life anyway and the player after you is near death, you might want to consider helping out with your last dart by setting up an easier score. Or not.

Rules For High Score

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High Score:

This is a VERY simple game for any number of players. It is very popular among soft-tipped dart players. It is also one of the few games in this list that may be played on an electronic board.

The Object: To be the first to reach a predetermined score, usually 1000.

The Scoring: Players' names are written across the top of the board in order and the board is divided into columns for each player's score. Order is usually determined by each player throwing one dart at bullseye; closest to the bullseye throws first, furthest throws last.

 

The Play: Each player takes turns trying to score the highest points with three darts. The thin outer "doubles" ring counts as two times the number hit and the thin inner "triples" ring counts as three times the number hit.

Play begins at zero and the total of the player's three darts is added to the previous total each round. First player to reach the target score wins the game.

NOTE: The score does not have to end on exactly the target score as it does in x01.

Strategy: Shoot lots of triple-20's or triple-19's.

 

Rules For Killers

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Killers:

Killers is a really fun game designed to be played with 3 or more people. The more people playing the more fun it is. It is a great game to play when there are an odd number of people and everyone wants to play darts. This is also an EXCELLENT way to practice your out's for x01.

The Object: To win killers you must simply be the last person on the scoreboard with a life left.

The Scoring: The names are place down the left side of the score board in any order. Generally, after the first game is played, the player who was knocked out first gets to throw first in the next game. For the first game, I usually do a closest to the bullseye with one dart each. Next to each name, three tally marks are placed to indicate the number of lives each player has left.

The Play: Play begins with each player, in order, throwing one dart left-handed (or right-handed if that player is a lefty). This is to set a random number and that number will be the players number for the rest of the game. Whatever number is hit is written next to that players name. No two players may have the same number, so if a player hits a number that was already taken that player should throw again.

The next step in the game is to become a "killer". You become a killer by hitting the double (the thin outer ring) of your number ONCE. When you hit a double of your number, write a "K" next to your name to show that you are a killer. NOTE: if you hit a double with your left-handed throw, you automatically become a killer, provided no one else already had that number.

Once you become a killer, the job now is to kill all your opponents. You accomplish this by hitting the double of THEIR number and they kill you by hitting the double of your number. One important note, if you hit your own double after you have become a killer you DO kill yourself! Each time a kill occurs, one life is erased from that player's tallies. Once the player has no lives left that player is out of the game. Play continues until the only one player has any life left.

Variations of this game can be played to adjust to the players' level. You could use all triples for stronger players or require a double bull to become a killer. For weaker players, use the thin inner wedge of the number. On occasion, I have had several average players and one "I never picked up a dart before" kind of person (notice they always seem to win!?!). So what I do is set that the "new player" only has to hit the thin or thick single wedge to become a killer or kill while the rest of us have to hit doubles. With all the combinations available it's easy to balance the play to be fun for everyone.

 

Strategy: There really isn't much strategy to this game but I can offer a couple of tips. First, try not to hit a number right next to someone else's. If you do, you will get accidental kills from people who were trying to kill the other player. Also players will tend to aim at that spot with the thought that there is more chance to kill someone if they don't yet have a favorite enemy yet.

Another tip is to try to stay neutral and to kill people evenly. If you blast someone, while ignoring other players it will be remembered for several games and that player will be out to get you.

Often the players try to take out the stronger players who have a better chance of killing them than the weaker players. This can often lead to the worst player wining the game because when the smoke clears, the stronger player will probably only have one life left. The weaker player, on the other hand, probably has all three lives left because that player was left alone. The weaker player now only has to hit one dart to win the game.

If you throw a bulls-eye left-handed and you can manage to hit the double-bull, you will probably win the game.

Rules For Looper

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Looper:

This is a very simple yet fun game to play. It is very similar to the basketball game "Horse" (you may know that game under other names). It may be played by any number of players and is more fun with alot of people. This game is actually pretty boring with only two players.

The Object: To win the game you must be the last player to have any lives left.

The Scoring: Players names are written in any order down the left side of the scoreboard. Usually, a throw of one dart each at bullseye with the closet player throwing first and the furthest throwing last. After the first game, the first player to get knocked out plays first and so on. Three tallies are marked next to each name to indicate the number of lives left.

The Play: The first player throws one dart left-handed (or right-handed if that player is a lefty) to set a random target. Because the first player has no chance to lose a life, the random throw is used to give the second player a fair chance.

The EXACT wedge or bullseye the dart landed is marked on the scoreboard. If the dart lands in the 5 between the triple ring and the bullseye, you would mark "S5" to indicate the small wedge of the 5. If the dart landed in the triple 5, you would write "T5". If the dart landed in the 5 between the triple and the double rings, you would write "B5" to indicate the big wedge of the 5. If the dart landed in the double 5, you would write "D5".

The next player now must try to land a dart in the exact same wedge of the board. If that player is unsuccessful with all three darts, one life is erased and the next player has a chance.

If the player is successful in matching the wedge any darts remaining in hand may now be used to score a new target. If the target was hit with the third dart, the player pulls the darts and has all three to establish a new target. All three darts need not been thrown in a turn the player may stop at any time after the number was matched and the last dart thrown at the board is the new target. The player may not make a choice of the darts thrown, only the last dart counts. If the player misses the board with the last dart that can be thrown, a life is lost and the target remains at the previous one set.

For example, a player has to hit "S5" (the small wedge of the 5). With the first dart he hits the "S5". He now has two darts to set a new target. He aims at double bull ("D25") and hits it. He may now choose to sit down and not throw the third dart and leave the "D25". Let's say that, for some insane reason (maybe drunkenness), he decides to try for a double 18, and misses off the board. He now loses a life and the next player now must hit "S5". The next player now gets up and hits the "S5" on his third dart. He pulls his darts and throws his first dart and hits "T20" (triple 20). Satisfied, he sits down choosing not to throw the other two darts.

If a player sets a target and all other players fail to match the target, when it's that players turn again, no throw is necessary. The player may choose to stay seated and keep the same target number. If the player chooses to risk trying a turn, the player MUST hit the target same as everyone else. If the player misses a life is lost just as if he did not set the number that stumped everyone else. It is usually wiser to just leave the number and not take the risk.

"So why do they call this 'Looper'?" The reason is that CLOSED loops of the numbers around the outside of the board count as valid targets! For example the loop that makes up the lower half of the number 6 is a target, however the upper hook of the 6 is not. These are written as "L", for example "L16" would mean the loop of the 16. The 8 and 18 each have two valid loops and which one is hit does matter. They would be noted as "UL8" for upper loop of the 8 or "LL8" for lower loop of the 8. As you can imagine loops are very hard to hit and are also very risky, if you miss slightly, you did not set a target number. However, if you do hit a loop, the other players have the difficulty of matching it.

Strategy: The only real strategy here is one of opportunity. If you hit the target number and have at least two darts to set a new one, try one dart at a loop. If you hit it sit down. If you don't, make sure you hit a new target even if it's an easy one with your last dart. Remember, hitting a big fat 16 and giving the next player an easy target is better than losing a life because your threw all your darts at a loop and missed or having a bounce-out with your last dart aiming for that double bull.

Rules For Mickey Mouse

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Mickey Mouse:

Mickey Mouse is a very simplified game of Cricket with a couple of twists.

The Object: The object of the game is to "close" all your numbers (20 down through 12, any three doubles, any three triples and bulls-eye). To close a number, you must hit three of that number.

The Scoring: The scoreboard is drawn with the numbers 20 through 12, doubles, triples and bullseye written in descending order down the center of the board. Bullseye is usually abbreviated with a B (or C for cork, another term for the bullseye). Doubles with a D and triples with a T (in Korea, they call the triples "trebles"). Each dart that lands in any of the games numbers count toward closing that number. The thin outer ring counts as two of that number or counts as one double. The thin inner ring counts as three of that number or counts as triple. Scoring for one dart is shown by placing a slash ( \ ) next to the number scored. Scoring for two is shown by placing an X next to the number scored. Scoring for three is shown by placing a circle next to the number to indicate it is closed. When three of a number is scored in any combination, it is closed.

The Play: The players each take a turn throwing one dart at bulls-eye, closet dart to the bullseye gets to throw first. The first player throws three darts at any of the scoring numbers to try to close that number. The player then scores the darts that he has thrown and play alternates until one person closes all their numbers.

Strategy: There really is no strategy to this game, simply throwing accurate darts.

The only real decision that can be made in a game is weather to score the doubles and triples as doubles and triples or score them as three of the number you hit. I tend to believe that if I only needed one dart to close the number I score it as a triple. If I needed two or more, I score it for what it's worth. You can also expect that you will be hitting triples right next to the number you were aiming at so you might just want to try scoring all your triples as "splashes".

Some of the better dart players in Korea (there were very few) prefer to play in strict order as the numbers are listed on the scoreboard. This means that splashes don't count and if you hit a triple 20 while aiming at 20's you MUST score it as 20's. This makes for some very LONG games when you get to the triples and doubles sections.

One night a couple of Australians and I decided to try the Korean Mickey Mouse game and play it with points like standard Cricket. This made for a very interesting game when you could score points based on doubles and triples being closed!

 

Rules For Nine Lives

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Nine Lives:

This is a simple game of elimination for any number of players. It does get a little long when there are a lot of players, however.

The Object: To be the first player to get "around the clock", that is to get at least one dart in each number from 1 through 20 in order.

The Scoring: Each player throws one dart at bullseye, closest to the bullseye goes first, furthest from the bullseye goes last. Each player gets three "lives" represented by three tally marks below their name. No, I don't know why they call the game 9 lives but you only get 3. Maybe it was invented with 3 players?

The Play: Each player takes a turn trying to hit each number from 1 through 20. The numbers must be hit in order or they do not count.

If a player misses with all three darts, one life is lost (a tally mark is erased) from that player. When all three of a players lives are lost, that player is out of the game.

The winner of the game is the first player to make it to 20 or the last player in the game to have any lives left.

Strategy: There isn't any.

Rules For Prisoner

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Prisoner:

This is a great game for large numbers of players, the more players, the better. It can be played with any number, however, even two. It has the strangest twist of any game I've ever played on the dartboard.

The Object: The object is to be the first to shoot "around the clock" one dart in each number from 1, clockwise, to 20.

The Scoring: No scoring is needed as long as each player can remember what number they left off at the last time they threw. If there are a lot of players (or some players have had a little too much suds) a list of names and current target number can be kept on the scoreboard.

Each player should throw one dart at bulls-eye, closest to the bulls-eye goes first. After the first game, order can be reversed with the winner of the previous game going last.

 

The Play: The first player tries to shoot one dart into each number, in order, starting with the number 1. Only the thin inner triple ring, thin outer double ring, and the wedge in between count as scoring the target number.

After the 1 is hit in any of the playable areas, the next target is 18 and so on, clockwise around the board.

If the player's dart misses the board (outside the doubles ring) or bounces out, the dart is left in the board for one turn. The player throws only two darts the next turn and then may pull the lost dart for use in the next turn after that.

Now for the REALLY weird part: If the player throws a dart into the area from the bullseye to the triples ring (bull and double bull included), the dart is left in the board and is a "PRISONER". A prisoner dart remains in the board until any player (including the player who threw the dart) hits the playable area of the same number (in the case of the bullseye, hitting another bullseye captures the prisoner). Once a player captures a "prisoner", the dart is his/hers to use for the rest of the game (unless it is lost in the same manner).

If there is more than one "prisoner" dart that may be captured, they may only be captured one at a time. For example, if there are two darts in the 18 between the bulls-eye and the triples ring, two darts must be thrown into the playable area of the 18 to capture them both.

After the first "prisoner" is captured, one player now has four darts to use while the player who lost the dart has only two. By the end of the game, you might be playing with 7 darts and none of them might actually be yours!

Play continues until one player has gotten a dart in every number from 1 through 20 in the target area. The first player to do this wins the game.

Strategy: The only strategy in this game involves the decision to progress towards reaching the 20 as opposed to trying to capture prisoner darts. While "wasting" darts trying to get the prisoner darts, other players may get too far ahead of you and win the game. Remember keeping your original three darts is the best idea, other peoples darts do not throw the same as yours and you will not be as accurate.

 

Rules For Road Rally

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Road Rally:

This is a very unique game based on an auto race. A lot of imagination is used in "laying out a course". It may be played by any number of players.

The Object: The object of the game is to hit each section of board included in the "course" and be the first to "cross the finish line".

The Scoring: One dart is thrown by each player and the closest to the bullseye throws first. The players names are written in order across the top of the board and the agreed upon course is written down the center of the board.

The "agreed upon course" is where the imagination aspect of the game comes in to play. Players must pick target sections of the board to be the "course" and the "obstacles". The obstacles are oil slicks, car wrecks, hair-pin turns, etc. All the obstacles must be hit with two darts in order to pass them, while the regular sections of course must be hit only once. All elements of the course are specific: the double, the triple, the small wedge, the large wedge are all considered different sections. Only the precise section of the board listed counts and the course must be played in strict order. I usually let each player name 2 or 3 course elements plus one obstacle. This way everyone has a chance to include their favorite numbers.

The Play: Each player takes turns going through the course as describe above.

After all the obstacles have been completed, the finish line must be crossed. The finish line consists of 2 bullseyes. Either two single bulls may be hit or one double.

Strategy: The only strategy is in how you choose the course. Try to set an obstacle that is a hard number to hit that you have practiced. Don't pick something common like double-16 or triple-20 that everyone is used to hitting.

 

Rules For Scram

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Scram:

This is a really fun game for two players that is played in two parts.

The Object: To score a higher score than your opponent after you've each had a turn as "scorer" and "stopper".

The Scoring: Each player throws one dart at bullseye, closest to the bullseye chooses to be the "stopper" or the "scorer". The "stopper" always goes first.

Players names are written in order across the top of the board with the numbers 1 through 20 and bull's-eyes written down the center of the board dividing the board into two columns.

The Play: The "stopper" plays first and throws three darts into different numbers. Each number that is hit is "stopped". Stopped numbers are shown by placing an X next to the numbers. Any part of the number may be hit to stop it.

After the stopper throws, the scorer now tries to score as high a score has possible with three darts. Any numbers that have been stopped, do not count towards a score. Any other numbers that have not been stopped count in the usual way. The thin inner "triples" ring counts as three times the number hit and the thin outer "doubles" ring counts as twice the number hit. Bull's-eyes count as 25 points and the double-bullseye counts as 50.

The scorer's score is kept as a running total and written on the scorer's side of the board. Once all the numbers and the bull's-eyes have been stopped, the round is over. The roles now reverse and the original stopper tries to score points while the original scorer stops numbers.

Whoever has the higher total at the end of two rounds wins the game.

Strategy: Use your opponents strengths and weaknesses against him/her. For example, I can't hit 18's to save my life but I can't be stopped on 16's and 19's. So, if you were playing me and new this, you should try to stop 19's and 16's first and let me flounder on the 18's all I want. Obviously it is important to try to stop the higher numbers first, though.

 

Rules For Shanghai

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Shanghai:

This is a fun and easy game to learn and is good practice because it covers the whole board. It may be played by any number of people or teams.

The Object: Try to score as many points as possible in 20 innings or "Shanghai" your opponent.

The Scoring: Each player throws one dart at bullseye, closest to the bullseye goes first. The names of the players are written in order across the top of the scoreboard and the numbers 1 through 20 are written down the left side of the board. Vertical lines are drawn to divide the scoreboard into columns, one for each player.

The Play: Each player takes a turn throwing three darts to score the highest score possible in that round. Only the wedge that is the same number as the round counts towards the score. For example, only 1's count in the first round, 2's in the second, etc. The thin outer "doubles" ring counts as twice the number scored and the thin inner "triples" ring counts as three times. After all twenty rounds have been completed whoever has the highest score wins.

The second way to win is to "Shanghai" your opponent. To Shanghai, you must hit one dart in the single, one in the triple and one in the double of the target number in any order. If you succeed in hitting a Shanghai, the game is over and you win regardless of the other player's score.

Strategy: If you hit a double or a triple with the first dart, always try for the Shanghai. If you miss it, you will still have a decent score and if you do get it, you win.

 

Rules For Shove Ha'Penny

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Shove Ha'Penny:

This is a very simple game that may be played with any number of players. Games go very quickly and may be finished in as little as nine darts.

The Object: The object of the game is to be the first to close all the numbers 1 through 9.

The Scoring: Each player throws one dart at bullseye, closest to the bullseye goes first.

Players names are written in throwing order across the top of the scoreboard. The numbers 1 through 9 are written vertically down the board. Vertical lines may be drawn to divide the board into columns for each player.

The Play: Players try to "close" each number from 1 through 9. To close a number you must hit 3 of each number in any combination. The thin outer ring counts as two and is called a double. The thin inner ring counts as three and is called a triple.

Scoring is represented in the following manner: a score of one is shown with a slash ("/"), a score of two is shown with an X and a score of three is shown with a circle ("O") to represent the number as closed.

Numbers may be closed in any order and any of the target numbers may be scored at any time. For example a player may choose to throw one dart at 1, one dart at 2 and one dart at 7 instead of trying for three at one number.

The one unique catch to this game is that if you throw more that three of a number, any extra darts that you throw must be given to your opponent. For example, with your first dart you hit a single 1, your second dart is a single 1 and your third dart is a triple 1. You have now scored a total of five 1's. You take three of them to close but the other two must be given to your opponent.

In a multi-player game (more than two) there are three variations on who to give the points to. The first is to give the points to the next player in throwing order. The second is to give the points to whichever player needs those particular points the most. The third is to allow the shooter of the extra points to choose which player will receive them. The method of distributing the extra points should be agreed upon at the beginning of the game and will be the method used throughout the entire game.

The only time extra points do not go to another player is when the extra points mean the player will win the game by getting those points. The winner of the game must throw the winning dart him/herself. A game could be won by having all the points but one given to a player and that player just hitting the one point to win the game.

Strategy: If you have a choice who to give the points to, be very careful who you choose to give the points to. If someone is really having trouble with a number, it might be better to give the points to someone else and let the player having trouble continue to have trouble.

 

Rules For 6-14

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6-14:

6-14 is an fun game to play and great practice for x01. It has a fixed number of rounds and moves very quickly. It may be played by any number of players or teams.

The Object: The object of the game is to score the most points in a fixed number of rounds.

The Scoring: The numbers 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 are written down the center of the score board with the players names written in order across the top. Playing order is determined by a throw at bullseye, closest dart plays first.

The Play: Players take turns aiming at the thin outer "doubles" ring of the number of the round they are in. In the first round, play is for the double-6, in the second round play is for the double-7, etc. Only the double of the current number counts for any score.

Each dart that lands in the proper double scores that player 50 points. For example, in the first round a player shoots a single-5, double-6 and double-6, the players score would be 100 points.

If a player shoots at least one dart into the double of the target number, that player gets an additional throw of three darts at the 20. The total of the 20's is added up in the usual way, the thin outer "doubles" ring counting as two 20's (40 points). The thin inner "triples" ring counting as three 20's (60 points). The rest of the 20 counts as one 20 (20 points). If none of the target doubles are hit, the player is not allowed a throw at the 20's.

The sum of 50 points for each of the target number double is added to the sum of the 20's and the score is written in the player's column next to the target number.

Play continues alternating players/teams until the "14" round is complete. The scores are totaled and the higher scoring player/team wins.

Strategy: Try to score a lot of points.

Rules For Slider

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Slider:

This is a very easy game, but good practice because it uses the whole board. It is also a very fast moving game and can usually be finished in under 10 minutes. Any number of players can play. Handicapping can be done by limiting the target area of stronger players.

The Object: To hit every number on the board IN ORDER from 10 through 20 with one dart and finish before the other players.

The Scoring: Scoring is not needed in this game as long as everyone can remember what number they are up to and what order they shoot.

The Play: The first player tries to shoot first at 10, when a 10 is hit, play moves on to 11 and so on until all three darts are thrown. The next player then does the same thing, and so on. Remember only the number that the player is shooting for counts and all the numbers must be shot in order.

If the player misses the target number with all three darts, the player "slides" back a number for the next turn. For example, if the player is throwing at 15 and misses with all three darts, the next time that player throws, the target number will be 14.

The first player to hit the 20 wins.

Strategy: There isn't any.

 

Rules For Soccer

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Soccer:

This is a game for two players or teams only. It is a very difficult game but is great practice because only bullseyes and doubles count.

The Object: To be the first player to score ten "goals".

The Scoring: No scoring is needed if you can simply remember each players points from one to ten.

The Play: One player from each team throws one dart at bullseye, closest to the bullseye goes first.

In order to score a "goal", the players first must "take possession of the ball". To take possession, you must hit a bullseye (either a single or a double, it does not matter). Once you have possession, you keep the ball until the other player/team takes possession by hitting a bullseye.

Only the player/team that has possession of the ball may score goals. To score a goal you must hit any double on the board. The doubles are the thin outer ring and the inner-bullseye. Any double you hit anywhere on the board counts as one goal and scores one point for you or your team.

Strategy: There isn't any.

Rules For Steeplechase

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Steeplechase:

This is a game that may be played by any number of players. It is good practice because it makes you aim at areas of the board you might not normally try to hit.

The Object: To be the first to win the "race" by making your way around the course.

The Scoring: No scoring is needed as long as you can remember playing order and what number each person is up to.

The Play: One dart is thrown by each player at bullseye, closest to the bullseye goes first.

You must hit one dart in each number starting with 20 and continuing clockwise around the board until the 5 is hit. Only the thin wedge between the bullseye and the triples ring (the thin inner ring) count. Any darts that fall outside of this area do not count. All numbers must be hit IN ORDER. Any number of darts may be used to hit the current target number, but once the number is hit, you do not throw your remaining darts and your turn is over.

The rules are different when you must jump the "fences". The fences are located at 6, 3 and 11. To successfully jump a fence, you must hit the triple of the number that the fence is located at instead of the thin wedge. You are also limited to nine darts (three turns) to try to jump the fence. If you do not succeed in jumping the fence with nine darts, you are out of the race.

I have also heard of this game being played with four fences located at 13, 17, 8 and 5. I personally like the first method better. First the locations of the fences in this method are a little confusing to remember. Secondly, having the fence in the number 5 to win the race can be very frustrating. When I tried this method, there were several games where nobody won! We made it all the way around the course and couldn't nail a triple 5. Try both ways and see what you think.

Strategy: Don't fall off your horse, it really hurts.

 

Rules For Sudden Death

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Sudden Death:

This is a VERY fast moving game for a large number of players. Playing with less than six players means the game will be over in two or three minutes.

The Object: To be the last person not eliminated.

The Scoring: No scoring is needed, all you have to do is remember playing order and what the LOWEST score thrown in each round is.

The Play: Each player (there are no teams in this game) throws one dart at bullseye, closest to the bullseye goes first.

Each player takes a turn trying to throw the highest possible score with three darts. Each dart scores the number where it landed with the thin outer "doubles" ring counting as two times the number hit and the thin inner "triples" ring counting as three times. The outer bullseye counts as 25 and the inner as 50 points.

After each player has thrown, whoever threw the lowest score that round is eliminated from the game and the next round is thrown with the remaining players. Whoever is left in the game at the end wins.

One fun variation on this game that I like is to score it like the Low version of High/Low and eliminate whoever threw the HIGHEST score. It's a lot of fun this way.

Strategy: Play your strongest numbers! A triple 16 (if that's your number) is a lot better score that floundering around the 20 and hitting 5's and 1's.

 

 

 

 

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